Reviews

Reviews

Below are some glowing reviews for Dr. Brooks’ book, “Tech Generation: Raising Balanced Kids in a Hyper-Connected World

Sophie Brown

Geek Mom “[…] Tech Generation is written by people who are as screen-obsessed as we are and will make a great resource for families struggling with tech issues, without making the tech itself the enemy.”Read the rest of the review here

Lorraine Ferry

Fresh Press

Parents often worry about raising kids in a tech-saturated world—the threats of cyberbullying, video game violence, pornography, and sexting may seem inescapable. And while these dangers exist, there is a much more common and subtle way that technology can cause harm: by eroding our attention spans. Focused attention is fundamental to maintaining quality relationships, but our constant interaction with screens and social media is shortening our attention span—which takes a toll on our personal connections with friends and family and our ability to form real relationships. This book guides parents in teaching their children how to reap the benefits of living in a digital world while also preventing its negative effects. Mike Brooks and Jon Lasser, psychologists with extensive experience working with kids, parents, and teachers, combine cutting-edge research and expertise to create an engaging and helpful guide that emphasizes the importance of the parent-child relationship. They reject an “all or nothing” attitude towards technology, in favor of a balanced approach that neither idealizes nor demonizes the digital.


Shahina Piyarali

Shelf Awareness, Writer and Reviewer

Tech Generation: Raising Balanced Kids in a Hyper-Connected World by Mike Brooks and Jon Lasser is a welcome addition to the growing field of developmental psychology addressing the challenges of parenting in our tech-saturated times. While much has already been written about harnessing the positive aspects of technology while avoiding the negative impact of too much screen time on children’s lives, Tech Generation still has plenty of new and fresh material to offer parents.

Brooks and Lasser advance their Tech Healthy Life model of cultivating a healthy relationship with technology using some crucial reminders: we must be the change we want to see in our children, a variation of Gandhi’s advice to “be the change you want to see in the world.” Parents must model a balanced, controlled and healthy relationship with their own screens before expecting their children to do the same. Secondly, our influence as parents is strongly dependent on the quality of the relationship we have with our children.

The authors offer practical advice paired with an empathetic understanding of day-to-day realities: busy parents, the powerful lure of games and social media on growing brains and the increasing dependence on technology at school. Topics such as authoritative parenting, mindful engagement with technology and the difference between parental monitoring and electronic surveillance are addressed with thought-provoking insight.

Every generation of parents faces child-rearing challenges. For parents of young children and teens today, maintaining a healthy relationship with technology is one of the principal challenges of our times.


Abbie Joiner

GoodReads.com

This was both enjoyable and IMPORTANT!! LOVED IT, THANK YOU!


Honest

Vine Voice, Amazon.com

A must read for every parent!

As a parent of four late teen and early 20’s adult children, I had a many of the same concerns as other parents as we find balance in life now that technology is everywhere. My kids did not get a cell phone until the age of 16 and did not text or use social media until after graduation of high school. My oldest two thank me often for having these house rules because they now have social media accounts, text often and use their phone throughout the day, but do not live with it in their hand and leave it at home often because it is a luxury and not a necessity in their lives. This Tech Generation book helps parents with children of all ages manage technology rather than becoming consumed or addicted to it and not being able to enjoy life outside staring at a glowing screen. The book includes many studies and support for balancing use of electronics in your life. All of those questions you have regarding your children are more than likely covered within these pages. When do you get a child a phone, tablet, laptop, game system, and the list goes on. All covered and discussed in detail helping all parents make those life altering decisions that will have a ripple effect for years to come.


tachi1

Vine Voice, Amazon.com

Common sense approach and support for stressed parent

“I really needed this book to help me organize my thoughts, prioritize my worries, and develop some sort of plan to deal with what will be an ongoing and ever-growing situation.”

“If you were to ask me what philosophy governs this book I would call it common sense realism:
• We have to accept this is not going away;
• we have to accept that all these technologies have positive and negative components;
• we have to establish some sort of balance (which they call “a moving target”;
• we have to monitor our own use of technology in order to maintain a face-to-face relationship with our children (and each other) and to set an example on the concept of limits;
• we have to recognize and accept that we might have a problem with “screen time” ourselves and we have to address it lest it interferes with our personal relationships and our relationship with our children;
• we have to remain aware that, as human beings, we NEED human connections and relationships and interactions. Technology does not replace or enhance human interaction—it is merely a communication or entertainment tool.”

“A lot of interesting topics are also covered, such as when is the right time to get a child his own computer or his own smart phone. Real-life examples illustrate these rites of passage. I found it interesting to note that, today’s children spend less time outdoors than prison inmates.

There are many checklists to help you evaluate what the current status is, what your general goals are, what your parenting style is, and other thought-provoking considerations. I found these really helpful—whether they currently apply to our situation or not—because they help me look at issues from different angles and consider factors that would not normally occur to someone with my personality, life experience, and beliefs.

All in all, this is a book that, without dictating or judging, helps you to analyze and understand, and feel less alone in this unexplored new world our children and grandchildren will have to live in.”


Bob Lane

Emeritus Professor of Philosophy and Literature at Vancouver Island University in British Columbia

Parents often worry about raising kids in a tech-saturated world – the threats of cyberbullying, video game violence, pornography, and sexting may seem inescapable. And while these dangers exist, there is a much more common and subtle way that technology can cause harm: by eroding our attention spans.

Focused attention is fundamental to maintaining quality relationships, but our constant interaction with screens and social media is shortening our attention spans – which takes a toll on our personal connections with friends and family and our ability to form real relationships.

Tech Generation: Raising Balanced Kids in a Hyper-Connected World guides parents in teaching their children how to reap the benefits of living in a digital world while also preventing its negative effects. Mike Brooks and Jon Lasser, psychologists with extensive experience working with kids, parents, and teachers, combine cutting-edge research and expertise to create an engaging and helpful guide that emphasizes the importance of the parent-child relationship. They reject an “all or nothing” attitude towards technology, in favor of a balanced approach that neither idealizes nor demonizes the digital. Brooks and Lasser provide strategies for preventing technology from becoming problematic in the first place; steps for addressing problems when they arise; and ways of intervening when problems are out of control. They also discuss the increasingly challenging issue of technology use in schools, and how parents can collaborate with educators when concerns arise over kids’ use of technology.

The basic premise is simple: the tech world can be a dangerous and destructive world, but also it is here to stay and we all need to learn how to use it and not abuse it! How many times have you been out in the city and noticed that everyone is hooked up to an electronic device? Teenagers on their cell phones, ear plugged into conversations or music, while trying to avoid other pedestrians or automobiles. Just this morning on a walk I witnessed a near disaster as a young man was crossing the street while looking at his phone and not paying attention to the world around him. A good Samaritan was able to grab him in time. He continued on his way, unhurt this time, and still connected.

As parents, we make decisions every day about how we should raise our kids. We put time and energy into ensuring that their needs are met. While every family is unique, we generally want our kids to be physically healthy, to do well in school, to maintain friendships, to develop interests and hobbies, and to engage with family members. An additional demand comes with the age of technology. We need to learn to achieve a “balanced use of technology” that will allow for the educated use of the many new devices available while still maintaining family and social connections based upon good old-fashioned conversations between and among living present non-hooked up persons. This book is an excellent way to learn strategies to do just that. It is a fact-based self-help book with a clear description of the problem; and with suggestions for coping as parents and consumers of digital materials such as those available via video games, cell phones, laptops, and tablets. The authors have developed an approach based on their experiences as researchers, clinicians, and parents. Dr. Mike Brooks earned his doctorate in Educational Psychology and has been a gamer since the dawn of the video game era. He did his dissertation research on the effects of video game violence on children, and he worked as a usability specialist in the tech sector in the first decade of the 2000s.

Dr.Jon Lasser earned a PhD in Educational Psychology and has worked as a university professor and psychologist in the public schools, as well as a clinician in private practice, serving children and families from preschool through high school. With two daughters now in their twenties, he has had direct experience navigating the rocky terrain of screen time with his own children. “In his private practice, Dr. Lasser works with children and their parents to promote social, emotional, and behavioral wellness. In many cases, Dr. Lasser works with kids and their parents to deal with the many challenges presented by screen time in family life.” The approach is easy to follow and as I mentioned, fact based. For example, chapters often start with a real- life problem:

Amber, age 18, was on a special European summer vacation with her parents before she was to leave for college. Amber was very active on social media and used Instagram and Snapchat to keep in almost constant contact with her friends. She hoped to share her European adventures with them as she experienced them. Amber’s parents had been saving money for quite some time to create an experience together that they hoped to cherish for years to come. While in Tuscany, Amber was frustrated about spotty cellular service. She wanted to post selfies to Instagram and Snapchat with the picturesque Tuscan landscape in the background. She became so obsessed with finding cellular service that she stopped appreciating her surroundings altogether. She got into some heated arguments with her parents about this. In exasperation, she screamed at them, “You don’t understand! If I can’t share all this with my friends, what’s the point?!” Her parents were both hurt and frustrated by their daughter’s behavior. They felt particularly sad that they had paid so much money for what was supposed to be a magical, bonding trip with their daughter who was about to leave home.

While we used to take a camera on our trips, snap pictures to bring home, and then build a photo album to share with friends and family; we now have this instant way of sharing with our cell phone and the internet. But as Amber’s case highlights: the “need” to share instantly can ruin the immediate appreciation of the adventure.

So, the practical questions, as articulated by the authors, are:
• How much screen time should kids have?
• When should I get my child a smartphone?
• When should I allow my child/ teen access to social media?
• How do I know if it’s too much screen time?
• What do I do if my child is abusing or misusing technology?

“Our incessant use of technology poses a formidable and insidious threat to our happiness. We are happiest in life when we are engaged in it. This is particularly true of our relationships, with which much of our happiness is inextricably linked.”

In a recent study , University of Texas at Austin researcher Dr. Adrian Ward and colleagues found a “brain drain” effect for the mere presence of a smartphone. That is, the presence of a smartphone, even when silenced, appears to reduce cognitive capacity. The researchers found that those individuals with the highest smartphone dependence were more adversely affected by the presence of their smartphones than those who are less dependent. “47 Study participants overwhelmingly rated that the presence of the smartphone did not interfere with their cognitive performance when, in fact, it was adversely affected— consistent with the study finding that people who rate themselves as adept multitaskers are actually poor at it.”

Once the problem is clear then the authors offer a solution: A Tech Happy Life model based on a three- tiered public health approach (preventing, addressing, and intervening).

Start with these observations, 1. Here’s the reality that we all know to be true: The only reason we didn’t use smartphones and tablets when we were kids is that they did not exist back then. 2. We live in a rapidly changing technological world that is filled with Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, PlayStations, iPhones, tablets, Fitbits, YouTube, Netflix, and, more recently, virtual reality headsets. By the time you read this, some of these technologies will likely have evolved. These advances aren’t going to slow down. Google, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft, and other companies are constantly trying to innovate and to offer technological advances to keep ahead of one another and the upstart competitors that try to establish themselves. 3. Technology is here to stay. • It is evolving rapidly. • It is increasingly becoming more integrated into our daily lives. • There are many pros and cons of technology. When we talk of the “pros” or benefits of technology, some of the broad categories include the following: • Increased knowledge • Increased productivity • Greater access to entertainment • Greater tools and opportunities for creativity • Improved social connection. Some of the broad categories of “cons” include the following: • Decreased attention • Decreased social connection • Decreased sleep • Decreased physical activity •

Another example:

David is a 17-year -old teen from an upper middle-class family. He goes to a fairly affluent public high school. While very bright, he underperforms in most of his classes and is generally a B– C student. He doesn’t have an after-school job or any organized extracurricular activities. Although he used to be involved in sports such as cross-country running, he has become more immersed in his world of gaming. He is an avid League of Legends player. He spends three to four hours per day playing and up to twice that on weekends, holidays, and throughout the summer. He has a very high-end computer that he built himself. Although extremely tech-savvy, most of this energy is directed to gaming. He avoids spending time with his parents and his 13-year-old sister. He declines invitations to play family games. Even when he goes on family trips or out to eat with them, he is on his cell phone either texting, using social media, or playing games. He rarely engages in activities with friends in real life. When not on a screen, he seems nervous, fidgety, distracted, and unhappy. He has aspirations to become a professional League of Legends player on the tournament circuit. He says he is happy overall, but only when allowed to game as much as he wants. The use of examples like the ones mentioned in the book work so well to engage the reader (oh, that’s just what happened to me!) that reading the book is an enjoyable experience as well as a learning opportunity. There are concrete and doable suggestions for parents to follow that should help to accommodate the use of the new technology while maintaining some of the best practices of the past.

Good book. I recommend it.


Cyberbullying, video-game violence, and sexting are common anxieties for parents. But an imbalanced use of technology isn’t a problem only for children; studies show that 28 percent of teens believe their parents are addicted to their phones. Coauthors and school psychologists Brooks (director, Austin Psychology and Assessment Ctr.; techhappylife.com) and Lasser (associate dean, Coll. of Education, Texas State Univ.) argue that screen time has become so integrated into our daily routines that we can’t imagine existing without it. Have we become servants to technology? Brooks and Lasser answer, yes.

Struggles with delayed gratification, decision fatigue created by myriad options, and continuous peer-to-peer comparisons are a result of this brave new world of hyperconnection. So how can we reap the benefits and minimize the fallout? Brooks and Lasser provide strategies on three levels: green for prevention (getting kids plugged into activities such as Girl Scouts, community service, and team sports; keeping screens out of bedrooms, setting time limits, and mindfully engaging), yellow for addressing emerging concerns (using collaboration and consequences to minimize challenges), and the red-light level, which calls for strong intervention when necessary.

VERDICT: A key title for libraries, with relevant research that supports a balanced approach to technology use.